Australia goes to the polls on Saturday May 21 to elect our Federal representatives. We asked our 25,000+ North Sydney Living followers what questions they would like to ask their candidates. Every candidate running in our local electorate of North Sydney received the same questions and the same opportunity to respond.

Below are their responses (in alphabetical order by candidate surname). Any candidate who has not yet responded may do so at any time and we will add to this list – just contact info@thelivingcollective.com.au.

 

But first, a bit about voting in the Federal Election North Sydney…

Do I have to vote? Yes, enrolling and voting is compulsory for Australian citizens aged 18 years and over.

Where can I vote? You can vote at any polling place in your state or territory on election day. Polling places are open from 8am to 6pm. To find your nearest polling place visit aec.gov.au/where

How can I vote early in person? If you are eligible, you can vote before election day at an early voting centre (open from May 9). For more information and to check if you’re eligible visit aec.gov.au/early or call 13 23 26.

How can I vote early by post? Postal voting is available to eligible voters. Check your eligibility and apply online at aec.gov.au/pvaComplete your application for a postal vote so it reaches the AEC by no later than 6pm Wednesday May 18 2022.

How can I make my vote count? On election day you will be given two ballot papers, a small green one for the House of Representatives, and a large white one for the Senate. You must complete both ballot papers.

On the green ballot paper for House of Representatives you must number every box in the order of your choice.

One the white ballot paper for Senate you have a choice of two ways to vote; either:

– Above the line (for parties or groups): If you choose to vote above the line you need to number at least 6 boxes
– Below the line (for individual candidates) : If you choose to vote below the line, you need to number at least 12 boxes

On either ballot paper, don’t worry if you make a mistake. You can ask for another ballot paper and start again. You can also practise voting on the AEC website – visit aec.gov.au/practise

Federal Election North Sydney Candidates (in alphabetical order)

Heather Armstrong, The Greens NSW

federal election north sydney
Image: Heather Armstong Facebook

1. Give us your elevator pitch – why should the people of North Sydney vote for you?

The Greens have the most effective, fully costed policies to properly address climate change, protect the environment and to foster justice and equality in our society. I have the skills and experience to fiercely advocate for the environment, justice, equality and the people of the North Shore. I was a prosecutor for the Commonwealth DPP for 26 years, and have real world experience in sustainability and bush regeneration, having converted an inner city to a sustainable home in the 1990s (now known as the Mobbs Sustainable House) and reforested degraded RMS land at Huntleys point, where my husband and I created a eucalyptus forest and understory for bird habitat.

2. What is your connection to the North Sydney area and tell us three places in the electorate that you love.

I attended High School at Cremorne Girls High School, and have been a Hunter’s Hill resident since 2002. I love the natural beauty of the area and our green open spaces. In particular, I love the forested headlands of Balls Head Reserve, Milsons point park t Kirribilli, and the Great North Walk, where I spend a lot of time doing bush regeneration as a volunteer with the Friends of Buffalo Creek and the Great North Walk bushcare group.

3. What do you see as the key issues Australian people will consider when casting their vote in the Federal Election North Sydney?

Climate change – it’s an existential crisis, but it’s also the opportunity for us to truly transform to a clean energy economy, and properly provide for all in our society.

Integrity in politics – particularly the need for a federal Integrity Commission, much like the ICAC we have in NSW.

Housing Accessibility – affordable housing is a huge problem, particularly for young people in the area.

Care for the vulnerable – The Greens want to increase welfare payments to above the Henderson poverty line; extend-Medicare cover for dental and mental health; improve aged care with enforced nurse-to-patient ratios; increase availability of free childcare to relieve financial pressure on parents, guardians and caregivers; boost funding for accessible public transport and nature accessibility for disable persons; close offshore asylum seeker detention, increase our humanitarian intake and reintroduce Permanent Protection Visas for refugees so they can rebuild their lives in Australia.

4. If you were to introduce one bill to bring before parliament, what would it be?

Reintroduce The Greens 2018 Integrity Commission bill, which passed the Senate in 2019 (with support from Labor & Independents, only for it languish for more than two and a half years in lower house until Scott Morrison dissolved parliament for the election.

5. In the event of a hung parliament, how will you vote?

In the interest of Australia and the planet.

6. Give us a brief overview of your position on the following:
– Whether there should be a Federal ICAC

Absolutely.

 – How Australia should handle the recent news of China’s involvement in the Solomon Islands

It’s vital to remember that defence does not necessarily require military spending. Having good international relations can be a stabilising force. Globalisation generally leads to a more peaceful world, as we have stronger trade and cultural connections between nations which discourages conflict.

The Liberal/Coalition government turned it’s back on the pacific islands, particularly with senior members of the Liberal party caught joking about sea level rise. They reduced spending and aid in the area, leaving a path open for other powers in the region to move in. we need to re-establish cultural and trading ties with our pacific island neighbours.

 – What action needs to be taken on climate change

We need to a 75% reduction in emission by 2030 and to reach net zero emissions by 2035 to meet what the scientific standard of what’s required. We need to stop all new coal and gas mines, and transform our energy production to clean, renewable energy as swiftly as we possibly can.

We’ll invest in large-scale public renewable energy and storage, to replace every coal-fired power plant in the country by 2030, high speed rail between Brisbane and Melbourne, greater financial support for installing batteries in homes, and to assist households transition off gas to renewable electricity and $1.2b over two years for nationwide EV charging grid.

The Greens will end the >$10b annually spent on fossil fuel subsidies, and transition those in the coal and gas industry to other work with a job for job guarantee, and create a new Manufacturing Australia Fund, to drive a jobs rich, manufacturing revival, to modernise and expand manufacturing in Australia.

We need to invest in real carbon capture i.e tree planting, soil & water quality improvements and national regeneration projects, to ensure the carbon surplus stays out of the greenhouse gas layer. To do this, The Greens plan to spend $1.8b over 4 years for tree planting and bush regeneration projects.

 – How small businesses struggling in the wake of Covid can be assisted

Increasing welfare spending puts more funds into the hands of low income earners, who in turn are more likely to spend that money in their local communities, helping small businesses and the economy.

In addition, the Greens $15 billion ‘Made in Australia’ manufacturing bank would have a similar structure to the existing Clean Energy Finance Corporation (CEFC) in terms of the Commonwealth balance sheet and provide direct grants, equity investment, financing and concessional loan options depending on the corporate structure of applicants, and would target small businesses, worker’s cooperatives, green not- for-profit and social enterprises that are engaged in innovative production, research and development.

 – What can be done to ease the soaring costs of living in Australia

  1. Increase mental and dental cover under Medicare.
  2. Increase income support for all welfare recipients to a point above the Henderson poverty line (currently $88 a day)
  3. Increase the universal free childcare to assist parents return to the workforce
  4. Housing affordability – establish a Federal Housing Trust to build a million public and social homes across cities, towns, regions and remote areas. Establish a shared equity scheme to buy up to 75% of a federal housing trust home.
  5. Fully fund Tafe and Universities.

7. How will you stay in touch with the people in your electorate to make sure their views are represented in Canberra?

I’ll have an office in the centre of the electorate and continue to engage with community members on all policy issues.

I won’t take donations from corporate interest groups or be swayed by commercial lobbyists.

8. How can we learn more about your views and stay in touch with your campaign for the Federal Election North Sydney?

I’m on Facebook if you search “Heather Armstrong Greens for North Sydney”, and our upcoming events are listed on The Greens website https://greens.org.au/events/nsw  or sign up to volunteer at https://greens.org.au/volunteer

William Bourke, Sustainable Australia Party

federal election north sydney

1. Give us your elevator pitch – why should the people of North Sydney vote for you?

Sustainable Australia Party is an independent community movement from the political centre, with a positive plan for an economically, environmentally and socially sustainable Australia. We support a science and evidence-based approach to policy – not a left or right wing ideology. Sustainable Australia Party has developed a broad policy platform to address Australia’s growing economic, environmental and social problems.

For starters, Sustainable Australia Party is campaigning to protect our environment, stop overdevelopment and stop corruption. We are also focused on key issues such as sustainable transport (and do not support more traffic inducing mega roads like the Beaches Link private tollway!), housing affordability and better aged care. If you want to send them a message and bring about real change, don’t waste your number 1 vote on a major party!

2. What is your connection to the North Sydney area and tell us three places in the electorate that you love.

I have lived in the North Sydney electorate for over 20 years and run a small marketing business in Crows Nest for most of that time. I was recently elected as a Councillor and Deputy Mayor at North Sydney Council – a role that is allowing me to serve the local community. I particularly love our parks and green spaces, harbour foreshore areas and villages with their strong café cultures.

3. What do you see as the key issues Australian people will consider when casting their vote in the Federal Election North Sydney?

Sustainable Australia Party is campaigning to protect our environment, stop overdevelopment and stop corruption. I believe that de-corrupting Australian politics is the key to a better society. I want the community to determine policy going forward, not vested interests through political donations. This de-corruption process can in part be achieved by direct democracy, including citizen juries and citizen-initiated plebiscites and referenda.

4. If you were to introduce one bill to bring before parliament, what would it be?

Without a healthy environment we do not have a healthy economy or society. I would therefore enshrine into Australian law the fundamental human right of a healthy natural environment for its citizens and prioritise this in all policy and development decision. This would have far-reaching implications for all decisions politicians take and help ensure we fulfill our primary moral responsibility to pass on a sustainable Australia to future generations, as well as protect our biodiversity.

5. In the event of a hung parliament, how will you vote?

Sustainable Australia Party supports a science and evidence-based approach to policy, not a left or right wing ideology. We value sustainability and real democracy. I would therefore not automatically support any major party. I would look at the science and evidence on an issue – something our policies are already based on – as well as properly engage in community feedback, and respond to legislation accordingly.

6. Give us a brief overview of your position on the following:
– Whether there should be a Federal ICAC

Sustainable Australia Party supports the establishment of a strong and independent Federal Commission to monitor and expose corruption and misconduct by federal politicians and officials, and equivalent bodies in all states and territories.

 – How Australia should handle the recent news of China’s involvement in the Solomon Islands

Sustainable Australia Party supports quiet and respectful diplomacy, not the sort of megaphone diplomacy our politicians are engaging in for their own political purposes. Australia should build and sustain respectful relationships with all nations.

 – What action needs to be taken on climate change

Sustainable Australia Party supports strong action on climate change to contribute to staying below 1.5 degrees global temperature rise compared to pre-industrial levels. There are many actions required including a target of net zero emissions by 2035, a moratorium on all new coal mines in Australia and a moratorium on all new fracking for coal seam gas. Further support for renewable energy technologies and energy efficiency initiatives is also required.

 – How small businesses struggling in the wake of Covid can be assisted

Small business is the backbone of our economy. We need to revitalise small business by reducing unnecessary red tape compliance costs and regulation, and thereby deliver a fairer marketplace. Initiatives would include introducing a GST-free threshold of $26,000 in turnover, so that all small businesses that register for the GST would only pay on turnover above this amount, in part to compensate small business for collecting GST.

 – What can be done to ease the soaring costs of living in Australia

By far the major cost of living is housing, yet successive federal governments have pursued higher housing prices through politically engineered hyper-demand. Sustainable Australia Party would address this root cause of the housing crisis by ending negative gearing and capital gains tax concessions for property investors (while grandfathering current investments), banning further foreign ownership and greatly slowing population growth.

7. How will you stay in touch with the people in your electorate to make sure their views are represented in Canberra?

I am regularly in the community in my role as Councillor and Deputy Mayor, getting feedback and helping residents. I also attend local markets and hold stalls on a regular basis to take further direct feedback. Social media and email are my other key engagement tools.

8. How can we learn more about your views and stay in touch with your campaign for the Federal Election North Sydney?

Sustainable Australia Party’s science and evidence-based policy platform can be found on our website here: https://www.sustainableaustralia.org.au/policies

On our website voters can also find links to subscribe to our eNewsletter and follow our social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter.

Lesley Kinney, Informed Medical Options Party

federal election north sydney

1. Give us your elevator pitch – why should the people of North Sydney vote for you?

I am determined to end mandates and bring back all rights and freedoms that have been withheld for the last two years. I will always be your voice for choice. I stand for Truth, transparency and accountability in government. I will remove government over-reach and hold them accountable for decisions made over the past two years, including those implementing health and other orders related to the mandates.

2. What is your connection to the North Sydney area and tell us three places in the electorate that you love.

I lived in Kirribilli and later Lavender Bay during art school, drama school and then after attending opera school, at which point I began touring with theatrical shows. My living room is full of my paintings of this electorate. I helped set up the Kirribilli Neighbourhood centre and I was one of the first teachers there, running jazz ballet for several years.  I organised street theatre for the first Kirribilli markets.

Two of my favourite places in this electorate are Luna Park and Lavender Bay. I worked previously as an entertainer at Luna Park and as a commentator on Captain Cook Cruises, boarding some of the smaller charters at Lavender Bay. My other favourite place is underneath the northern landing of the Sydney Harbour Bridge and my painting from there also graces my living room.

Another favourite is the Cremorne Orpheum Theatre. I’m so grateful it was renovated and remains with us!

I love the many little coves and beaches around our beautiful Sydney Harbour National park.

3. What do you see as the key issues Australian people will consider when casting their vote in the Federal Election North Sydney?

1. Freedom, freedom of choice, freedom of congregation, freedom of movement, freedom of speech and the individual’s right to bodily autonomy.

2. End the mandates

3. The economy

4. Stop the suppression of scientific and medical papers and independent journalism, and allow debate and questioning of the status quo.

5. Halt the rollout of 5G infrastructure.

6. Keep banks and atm’s open and keep cash in circulation.

7. Restore land titles and limit foreign ownership of our land and amenities.

4. If you were to introduce one bill to bring before parliament, what would it be?

To introduce proper human rights legislation into our constitution which will also end the mandates and open up our country.

5. In the event of a hung parliament, how will you vote?

Assuming it will be between One Nation and UAP (they have candidates in every seat and UAP is the largest party in Australia), I would vote One Nation. If it is between Liberal or Labor and UAP, I would vote UAP. If the freedom parties form a coalition I would vote for that.

6. Give us a brief overview of your position on the following:
– Whether there should be a Federal ICAC

Absolutely – truth, transparency and accountability is my number One policy.

 – How Australia should handle the recent news of China’s involvement in the Solomon Islands

 

 – What action needs to be taken on climate change

We need to clean up pollution, reduce emf transmission from small cell radiation to preserve nature’s ecosystems.

 – How small businesses struggling in the wake of Covid can be assisted

First stop the mandates, they are crippling businesses. Get people back to work (stop mask and needle mandates for workers); allow workers to travel freely (no masks on public transport). Keep banks and atm’s open and cash in circulation. Businesses wanting to start up again should have meaningful incentives and empty premises could be used as pop up shops with short term affordable rents to get businesses started.

I would like to see full accountability for the recent and current mandates and full disclosure of the impact lockdowns, mask mandates and inoculations have had on the population. Freedom of choice is key in a democracy and essential for getting businesses back on their feet.

Free up tourism and hospitality -reestablish trust in the Australian tourism industry. This electorate has many world famous icons and top Australian destinations. People need to be able to travel without fear of discrimination, mandates or lockdowns.

 – What can be done to ease the soaring costs of living in Australia

Introduce an Australian controlled gold backed currency.

Keep banks and atm’s open and cash in circulation

Charge realistic prices for our natural resources and exports.

Bring back Australian manufacturing and support family operated farms.

Limit foreign ownership of land, businesses and amenities.

Stop paying exorbitant amounts to pharmaceutical companies for ill-tested and ineffective drugs.

7. How will you stay in touch with the people in your electorate to make sure their views are represented in Canberra?

I will have a shopfront in the electorate (I have a beautiful heritage one in mind) with an open-door policy for people to voice their concerns with me personally. I take personal consultation very seriously. I will work through a number of community organizations such as North Shore Nature Conservation Society, AHAA, Lane Cove Theatrical Society, various sports groups, parenting groups and advocates for aged-care, refugees, first nations and the disabled to ensure that all voices are heard.

8. How can we learn more about your views and stay in touch with your campaign for the Federal Election North Sydney?

You can find me on email: lesleykinney@gmail.com,

Facebook at:

https://www.facebook.com/Lesley-Kinney-IMOP-Candidate-for-North-Sydney-101729562529013/?notif_id=1651080769209435&notif_t=page_fan&ref=notif

My IMOP page is

https://imoparty.com/Lesley-Kinney

Victor Kline, TNL

federal election north sydney

1. Give us your elevator pitch – why should the people of North Sydney vote for you?

Our slogan is ‘Fighting for Compassion, Justice and Integrity’. These concepts, along with Equality of Opportunity, the once proud bases for our democracy, have become unfashionable and something to deride. We test all our policies against them, making sure those policies are compassionate, promote justice and are founded in integrity – and that they always provide equality of opportunity. It is our fundamental aim to restore compassion, justice and integrity to the centre of the Australian political debate and to the centre of Australian life.

2. What is your connection to the North Sydney area and tell us three places in the electorate that you love.

I have lived in the electorate for the last 20 years – three in North Cremorne and then 17 in Crows Nest. I love Willoughby Rd restaurant strip in Crowie, the view from McMahon’s Point, and the multicultural pageant of Chatswood Mall on Saturday morning.

3. What do you see as the key issues Australian people will consider when casting their vote in the Federal Election North Sydney?

Climate change, corruption in government and the degradation of our public education system. Also on a purely local level, the Northern Beaches tunnel.

4. If you were to introduce one bill to bring before parliament, what would it be?

Whilst any thinking person would see climate change as our number one issue, the bill I would introduce would be for an ICAC on the model we propose with real sanctions. This is because unless we clean up corruption in government, nothing will be done on climate change or anything else worthwhile for that matter.

5. In the event of a hung parliament, how will you vote?

Our policy is that we will guarantee supply but not confidence. This means that we will treat all legislation on its merits and vote accordingly. We will not ‘support’ any party by giving them a blank cheque. However, if the Governor General were to ring us and ask which way we would lean, we would have to say Labor. I stress this is not because we think they are likely to be any better. But we know there is no hope with the current government. So logic dictates we give the other side at least a chance to prove themselves better.

6. Give us a brief overview of your position on the following:
– Whether there should be a Federal ICAC

We have the strongest ICAC policy in the country providing for real sanctions. A retrospective ICAC with power to investigate and prosecute politicians, judges and bureaucrats who have been corrupt or who have acted in dereliction of their duty or who have abused their powers. They would be tried before a judge and jury in a separate court and if convicted would face a fine or imprisonment and disgorgement of any ill-gotten gains.

 – How Australia should handle the recent news of China’s involvement in the Solomon Islands

We need to spring into action on the diplomatic level and try to do ex post facto what we should have done decades ago – treat our neighbours in the Solomons as our equals and offer them whatever help and support they need. I fear however that the because of the bungling of successive governments, and the Solomons deal with China, it may well be too late.

 – What action needs to be taken on climate change

We have the strongest climate policy in the country (indeed in the world along with Finland and Norway). We say that we are in a climate emergency and that we must reach net zero emissions by 2030. We say that if we wait till 2040 or 2050, we won’t have to worry about any other problems because the problems won’t be here, because we won’t be here. In our climate policy – Action on Climate Change www.tnl.net.au/policies , former Chief Scientist at the CSIRO and world-renowned economist Professor Steven Keen, explain in detail why we are in a climate emergency, and so why 2030 is essential. They also explain how we can get there both from a technical and an economic perspective.

 – How small businesses struggling in the wake of Covid can be assisted

We have a detailed plan to assist small business owners, by cutting the red tape which is strangling them and by investing in their entrepreneurial skills (either directly or via our proposed public bank), so they can not only survive but can also look to expanding their business into medium size concerns. The plan not only assists them, but via the investment we will provide, will stimulate the whole economy.

 – What can be done to ease the soaring costs of living in Australia

We need to address supply chain deficiencies and invest in building up our manufacturing capabilities again. Inflation is s function of the fact that we are 82nd in the world (below Zimbabwe and Rhodesia) in manufacturing capacity. We just dig holes and invest in a housing bubble. If we build back our manufacturing capacity, we will not be dependent on foreign imports, which are vulnerable to wars and pandemics and diplomatic failures, which cause demand to far outstrip supply and thus push prices up.

7. How will you stay in touch with the people in your electorate to make sure their views are represented in Canberra?

I will follow the English model of holding a ‘surgery’ once a week where citizens can just turn up and speak with me about their concerns. I will also maintain a ground floor presence in somewhere like Willoughby Rd or equivalent central and accessible venue. I will make my personal email and mobile available – as I do now.

8. How can we learn more about your views and stay in touch with your campaign for the Federal Election North Sydney?

The policies which the party I lead follow, can be found at www.tnl.net.au/policies . My personal mobile has always been available for people to call me anytime between 6AM and 10PM – 0419686783. Or I can be emailed on victorkline@tnl.net.au. I can also be followed on the TNL Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/tnloz

 

Robert Nalbandian, United Australia Party

1. Give us your elevator pitch – why should the people of North Sydney vote for you?

If you want someone bold who will put Australia and Australians first, vote for me. The current politicians and other candidates are not addressing the real issues facing every day Aussies.

2. What is your connection to the North Sydney area and tell us three places in the electorate that you love.

Grew up near here (Bradfield) and been living in the area for over 10 years. 3 places would be Anytime Fitness Lane Cove, Chatswood shopping areas and Springbok Delights (they have great jerky meats).

3. What do you see as the key issues Australian people will consider when casting their vote in the Federal Election North Sydney?

The economy, especially repaying the $1 Trillion dollar debt without taxing Australians, and the interest rates rises affecting home loans.

4. If you were to introduce one bill to bring before parliament, what would it be?

Bill of Rights to end lockdowns, vaccine passports and mandates, to respect Sanctity of Doctor-Patient Relationship, to protect freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from fear, and freedom of association and prevent lobbyists from holding official positions in political parties.

5. In the event of a hung parliament, how will you vote?

What makes you think it will be a hung parliament? What if the UAP forms a coalition of other minor parties?

6. Give us a brief overview of your position on the following:
– Whether there should be a Federal ICAC

Yes, in fact Senator Dio Wang from WA from Palmer United Party around I think 2013 tried to bring this in, but neither major party was serious.

 – How Australia should handle the recent news of China’s involvement in the Solomon Islands

Australia needs to have a strong military. 1 Hostile warship near our shipping routes, and we could run out of fuel within a few short months. We need to protect ourselves first, before being involved with any foreign conflicts or issues.

 – What action needs to be taken on climate change

We need to have open discussions about all the facts, and listen to multiple groups. The easiest way to remove all our emissions which is less than 1% of the worlds emissions is by using nuclear power.

 – How small businesses struggling in the wake of Covid can be assisted

Stop the provisional tax being paid before profits releasing about $90 Billion back into the economy, end all lockdowns and mandates, repay the $1 Trillion dollar debt, which will free up money in the budget, bring back $1 Trillion in Australian super home and invest it here locally, process Australian minerals locally, manufacture products locally. There is so much we can do to help all businesses and everyone in Australia.

 – What can be done to ease the soaring costs of living in Australia

Make the first $30,000 paid on a home loan tax deductible each year, supply the nation with cheap nuclear power, manufacture products again in Australia to generate wealth, add incentives for people to live away from major cities with zonal taxation polices, increase the aged pension by $180 a fortnight, forgive all HECS and make higher education free for Australians.

7. How will you stay in touch with the people in your electorate to make sure their views are represented in Canberra?

When I win, you can all come visit at my official office, or speak via social media (FB, YouTube, Twitter).

8. How can we learn more about your views and stay in touch with your campaign for the Federal Election North Sydney?

Reach out to me on Facebook – Robert Nalbandian UAP North Sydney

Catherine Renshaw, Australian Labor Party (NSW Branch)

1. Give us your elevator pitch – why should the people of North Sydney vote for you?

I am proud to be Labor’s candidate. I have always thought how lucky we are to live in North Sydney, with access to some of the best health and educational facilities and surrounded by beautiful bushland and waterways. Unfortunately, since 2013 with the election of Tony Abbott, through to 2019 with the election of Scott Morrison, I have felt a sense of shame and despair. I haven’t felt that we are a country of courage that will stare a problem like climate change in the face, and take the opportunity to build a better future. I haven’t felt that we are a country whose leaders are upright and honourable, and act with integrity. This has to change.

I have never run for office before. I am a lawyer, a professor of human rights law, a mother, and a local. I have skills that can help us get back on track. I know how parliament works and how laws operate – or should operate – to improve the lives of ordinary people.

I want to give our community the chance to elect a representative who will really act on the issues they care about. The residents of North Sydney have told me they want action on climate change, on housing affordability, on cheaper childcare, on an aged care system that treats older Australians with respect, on integrity in federal politics. They want Australia to manufacture things itself again and they want a tertiary system that trains Australians in the skills needed for a strong future. These are the issues that I want to work on in parliament as the representative for North Sydney.

2. What is your connection to the North Sydney area and tell us three places in the electorate that you love.

I have lived in North Sydney for a very long time. When I was born my parents were living in an apartment in Waverton. I went to school in the heart of North Sydney at Monte Sant Angelo Mercy College. I have lived and raised my three children in Northbridge for the past 14 years. Three places that I love are Lane Cove National Park, where I cycle and walk; Blues Point, where I often take a rug and a book and spend an afternoon reading in the sun (before I decided to run for parliament – this sort of indulgence has not been a feature of life since January) and the many wonderful sporting fields like Naremburn Park and Blackman Park, where I watched the kids score their goals and tries over many years.

3. What do you see as the key issues Australian people will consider when casting their vote in the Federal Election North Sydney?

· Cost of living (eg childcare)

· Fighting corruption, and returning integrity to Parliament

· Climate change

· The aged care crisis

· Creating secure local jobs, and ending wage stagnation

4. If you were to introduce one bill to bring before parliament, what would it be?

A National Anti-Corruption Commission. Transparency, accountability and integrity underpins everything else. If we don’t have that, we have nothing.

5. In the event of a hung parliament, how will you vote?

I will proudly support a Labor government, irrespective of the composition of the Parliament.

6. Give us a brief overview of your position on the following:
– Whether there should be a Federal ICAC

We urgently need a National Anti-Corruption Commission! This is a priority for Labor – by Christmas we will establish a well-funded, powerful NACC that can investigate all instances of corruption, past and present.

 – How Australia should handle the recent news of China’s involvement in the Solomon Islands

We must restore Australia’s place as the partner of choice for the countries in the Pacific, and reassure the region that they can rely on Australia. Labor will secure our region and build a stronger Pacific family, to help face our shared challenges and achieve our shared goals.

 – What action needs to be taken on climate change

I believe that our Parliament has a moral obligation to urgently address climate change. We are seeing the effects of climate change now, with the Black Summer bushfires and the recent floods devastating both our environment and Australian communities. Labor’s plan to achieve a 43% reduction on 2005 emissions has been independently modelled and will create 604,000 jobs, with 5 out of 6 of them in the regions. It will spur $76 billion of investment and cut power bills for families and businesses by $275 a year.

 – How small businesses struggling in the wake of Covid can be assisted

Labor understands how precarious and stressful running a small business can be, especially in times like these. This is why we will legislate to guarantee support to small businesses in times of crisis. Labor will also save Australian businesses a staggering $804 million every year by cutting merchant fees. Labor has further pledged to reduce the administrative burden faced by owners of small businesses. If elected, Labor will cut red tape and reduce time that small businesses spend on paperwork and taxes.

 – What can be done to ease the soaring costs of living in Australia

Labor will lower costs of living by reducing childcare fees for 96% of families, lowering taxes for working families, addressing wage stagnation, lowering electricity costs, helping people break into the housing market and pushing for greater employment security.

7. How will you stay in touch with the people in your electorate to make sure their views are represented in Canberra?

I think that it is crucial that our community’s participation in our democracy is not limited to casting a vote on election day. To me, democracy is realised when our elected representatives have an ongoing dialogue with their constituents. It is so important to empower Australian citizens, and allow them to have their voice meaningfully heard long after an election has passed. For that reason, if elected I will always listen to and advocate for constituents who contact me, and I will proactively reach out to community leaders, businesses, and individuals to ensure that any decision I make is informed by what North Sydney needs.

8. How can we learn more about your views and stay in touch with your campaign for the Federal Election North Sydney?

You can contact me at Catherine.Renshaw@nswlabor.org.au, and on most social media platforms. You can also learn more about me at my website, https://renshaw4northsydney.com/. Please don’t hesitate to get in touch!

Kylea Tink, Independent

1. Give us your elevator pitch – why should the people of North Sydney vote for you?

North Sydney is a vibrant, intelligent and diverse community that wants faster action on climate, integrity brought to federal politics, a sustainable and renewable economic future and systemic inequality across our country addressed. Frustratingly, our federal electoral vote has been used to block progress on those priorities throughout this past term.

For over a decade now under the current two-party system, we’ve had very little legislative reform as the parties focussed more on how to maintain or gain power rather than genuine, long-term goals. We deserve better. As North Sydney’s Independent, I will not be bound by party politics, but rather will vote in a fully transparent fashion, in a way that is consistent with our community’s ambitions.

For over 35 years, I’ve been a business leader and social advocate, fighting for families facing cancer, children held in offshore detention centres and vulnerable young Australians in my many roles including as CEO of the McGrath Foundation and CEO of Camp Quality. People who know me will tell you I argue for what I believe in like I know I am right, but listen like I know I am wrong, enabling me to be constantly working towards the best outcome for all.

2. What is your connection to the North Sydney area and tell us three places in the electorate that you love.

North Sydney is my home. For over 15 years, I have lived and built and managed businesses here. It’s where my three children have gone to school and the majority of my friends reside. My family is deeply connected to the local community.

We are fortunate in North Sydney to have a huge range of activities and natural environments to enjoy. With three teenagers and two dogs, much of our family time is spent outdoors and I am incredibly grateful for the green spaces and water that surround us. I have many favourite spots including: playing and watching sports or walking through Tunks Park and Flat Rock Gulley; doing one of the many beautiful foreshore walks particularly around Waverton; and catching up with friends in one of the many small bars, restaurants and cafes of Crows Nest.

3. What do you see as the key issues Australian people will consider when casting their vote in the Federal Election North Sydney?

  • Climate action: We want our Federal Government to take urgent action that is led by facts, not politics. As an electorate with one of the highest concentrations of rooftop solar in the country, North Sydney is unique placed to both benefit from, and inspire others to achieve, a faster transition to 100% renewable and sustainable energy.
  • Corruption in politics: We want to restore trust in our democracy by stamping out corruption, pork-barrelling and the wasteful spending of this past Government.
  • A strong, forward-focussed economy: We want intelligent, capable leaders who can guide our nation through today’s complex economic challenges by ensuring we have the right skills and capabilities to meet future demand, and that households and small businesses are supported.
  • Australia’s treatment of women, older Australians, asylum seekers and First Nations Australians: We are appalled by stories of sexual harassment in politics; shocked by the findings of the Royal Commission into Aged Care; and embarrassed by our inhumane treatment of refugees. And we want action on the Uluru Statement of the Heart, towards a reconciled Australia. Systemic inequality must be called out and addressed now – before the gap between those that have and those that have not becomes even larger.

4. If you were to introduce one bill to bring before parliament, what would it be?

I have committed to tabling a Private Members Bill to legislate vehicle and fuel efficiency standards in Australia within my first 12 months in Parliament.

Australian cars currently run on some of the dirtiest and most emissions-intensive fuels in the world. This is harming our health, environment and economy, with car manufacturers warning that Australia is becoming a “dumping ground” for inefficient vehicles. Dirty fuel is particularly problematic for our North Sydney community, given the amount of vehicular traffic that passes through our electorate each day.

Modelling shows that the introduction of fuel and vehicle efficiency standards will save every car owner between $500 and $800 a year. It is also an economic opportunity to reinvigorate our manufacturing industry and play a role in producing the greenest batteries and EVs in the world.

My Cheaper, Cleaner Transport Bill will task experts with developing options and a timeline for Parliament to pass strong vehicle efficiency and emissions standards, and identifying measures that the Government will need to put in place to help drive this transition. It will also require Australia to report deaths caused through air pollution each year, to ensure we build in an accountability measure to improve air quality.

5. In the event of a hung parliament, how will you vote?

There are many scenarios that could play out in the current election, and I may not be required to support either major party. If, however, I am asked to help put a government in place, I would speak to those seeking to lead, and would only offer support to those who are prepared to push for progress on the issues that matter most to the community of North Sydney including faster action on climate, integrity in politics, and addressing systemic inequality.

Importantly, as North Sydney’s Independent, my support for a party to form government would not mean that I would then vote with this party consistently going forward. While I would commit to not blocking supply, the reality is that beyond that I will work every day to ensure each and every piece of proposed legislation is weighed on its own merit with the North Sydney vote cast in a way that is consistent with our community’s ambitions.

6. Give us a brief overview of your position on the following:
– Whether there should be a Federal ICAC

Yes. We need a Federal ICAC with teeth to tackle the distortions in our economy and prevent waste, mismanagement and rorting. I support Helen Haines’ Integrity Legislation and would exercise North Sydney’s vote behind it to get that legislation passed.

 – How Australia should handle the recent news of China’s involvement in the Solomon Islands

Australia is always at our best when we have strong relationships with multiple international nations, and treaties play an integral role in this. It is imperative we continue to work to be a preferred partner across the Pacific. At the same time, we must respect our Pacific neighbours’ sovereign rights and focus on ensuring future discussions remain nuanced and do not fall foul to ego-driven politics.

We must continue to invest in our diplomatic services and foreign aid with our intention always being to both advocate for, and protect our own values and sovereignty, whilst offering mutual respect to others.

 – What action needs to be taken on climate change

North Sydney wants Australia to take faster and more ambitious climate action. I am pushing for a carbon emission reduction target of 60% by 2030, and for the development of a plan for Australia to achieve Net Zero by 2040. I will work collaboratively with councils and state government to turn North Sydney into one of the first Net Zero Urban Energy zones in Australia.

In addition to the vehicle and fuel efficiency standards bill I plan to table, I am also committed to supporting the Climate Bills presented by Zali Steggall MP during the last parliamentary term to ensure we have a national framework that moves beyond political ideology to move our climate approach forward faster.

 – How small businesses struggling in the wake of Covid can be assisted

COVID has disrupted many businesses, and will require them to continue to adapt as people settle into new post-pandemic routines. We will need to support our small businesses through this time, to genuinely listen to their concerns and seek to address them collaboratively. At the same time we also need to look at human capital and ensure that local businesses are able to access the people that they need to continue to operate. Business needs to be made simpler and we must focus on building our own sovereign capacity by supporting those who build businesses in Australia.

 – What can be done to ease the soaring costs of living in Australia

Many of the cost-of-living challenges we now face are the result of long-term problems that have been left unaddressed, due in large part to politicking and the general lack of long-term ambition.

Simply throwing money at problems like fuel prices and housing affordability, in the form of temporary subsidies, is unlikely to offer real solutions. We need genuine reform – that’s why I have committed to urgently convening a Housing Summit, if elected, which will bring together state and local government, developers and residents to begin an active dialogue to address and discuss long term plans for our electorate. It is also in part why I have committed to pushing for legislated Vehicle and Fuel Efficiency standards.

7. How will you stay in touch with the people in your electorate to make sure their views are represented in Canberra?

Great question – this is a key priority for me. As a community Independent, my entire campaign has been about talking to people across the electorate, finding out what matters to my community, and consulting with experts to come up with viable solutions. I am absolutely committed to ensuring that it is the community’s voice that is represented in Parliament – not my own, nor that of a party.

If I am fortunate enough to be elected North Sydney’s representative in the upcoming election, I will continue to consult widely with the community and my team and I will be constantly working to find solutions for you.

I plan to host community meetings on specific policy areas. I am also open to conducting community surveys, and online referenda on significant matters. My office, once established, will always be a welcoming place where community members are invited to drop in to share their thoughts. And I plan to continue updating and engaging constituents through my website and regular newsletter.

8. How can we learn more about your views and stay in touch with your campaign for the Federal Election North Sydney?

Visit my webpage at kyleatink.com.au, and connect with my team on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and Youtube. Younger voters may want to connect with our KTNextGen volunteers, who have their own very engaging social media channels. (Their TikTok channel made the news recently!)

You can also subscribe to my email newsletter for weekly updates on my campaign activities and policy positions. We’ve been sending these newsletters out for over 33 weeks now and it’s incredible to see how the campaign has grown over this time.

And you can visit my office on the corner of Willoughby Road and Albany St, Crows Nest, which is always abuzz with activity with so many of our pink-shirted TeamTINK volunteers popping in to pick up campaign materials and say hello throughout the day.

Dajen Tinkler, Liberal Democratic Party

No responses received as yet.

 

Michael Walls, Pauline Hanson’s One Nation

No responses received as yet.

 

Trent Zimmerman, Liberal Party of Australia (NSW Division)

1. Give us your elevator pitch – why should the people of North Sydney vote for you?

I am seeking re-election as your MP to continue my work for our local community and as a strong and effective voice on the key issues for residents in the federal parliament and within government. Service and giving back to the community is one of the most important things a person can do, which is why I stood for federal parliament six years ago.

As the Member for North Sydney, I am proud of what we have been able to deliver for our local community including increased funding for local schools and our hospitals, mental health services and investments in local facilities – like Lane Cove Pool, the North Sydney Pool and facilities at Tantallon and Thomson Ovals, the support we have given to allow community groups to install solar panels and my work to enhance access to our Harbour foreshores.

I have brought a strong and sensible voice for the values and priorities of our community, including on economic management, reduced tax levels for small businesses and individuals, ambition on climate policy, leadership in health policy and the role of science, technology and innovation which is where I believe so many of our future opportunities lie.

2. What is your connection to the North Sydney area and tell us three places in the electorate that you love.

I am passionate about our area and have lived on the lower north shore for over two decades.  During that time, I have been deeply involved in our community – long before I decided to stand for federal parliament.  I am an active Rotarian, served as a North Sydney Councillor for eight years and have worked in the community through a range of local organisations. This included, prior to my election, service on my local public school board, and the boards of the Crows Nest Community Centre and the Kirribilli Ex-Service Club.  I have also served on the board of Epilepsy Action Australia, the ANZ Branch of the International Association of Public Transport and the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Business Association.

There are so many places in our area I love but if I had to nominate just three, I would say the vibrancy of Chatswood and its multicultural food scene, Wendy Whiteley’s Secret Garden and the bushland of Balls Head Reserve.

3. What do you see as the key issues Australian people will consider when casting their vote in the Federal Election North Sydney?

There are three great challenges and opportunities the Australian Parliament will need to face over the coming three years which are raised with me by residents.

First, supporting our economic recovery, which is already leading the world as we emerge from the biggest economic shock in most of our lifetimes. That means focusing on creating jobs (and reducing unemployment to below 4 per cent), training and the opportunities that will come from our Modern Manufacturing Plan and our strategy to make Australia a top ten digital economy.

Second, the work we must continue to do to support our democratic values globally which are under the greatest pressure since the end of the Cold War. The was in Ukraine is a clear demonstration of this and why the work we have been doing on building our relationships with our democratic allies is so important.

Third, delivering on our commitment to a net zero economy which is something I fought hard to secure.  The energy transition is already underway with Australia having one of the highest uptakes of renewables, per capita, in the world and our emissions down by 20 per cent over the 2005 baseline year. I will always support greater ambition to reduce our emissions.  This is also an opportunity for Australia to become a major exporter of our technology – be it solar energy to South East Asia or our work to develop a hydrogen industry.

4. If you were to introduce one bill to bring before parliament, what would it be?

As Chair of the Parliament’s Health Committee, I delivered a major bipartisan report late last year on how we can improve access to new medicines and medical technologies for Australians, particularly for those with rare diseases.

This is an area of work I am passionate about as there are exciting treatments, particularly in gene and precision health care, under development.

Our report made significant and well-received recommendations and I am committed to seeing these implemented – both legislatively and in terms of funding and broader government policy. Seeing our report implemented is one of my key priorities to ensure Australians can affordably access the very best of those new treatments.

5. In the event of a hung parliament, how will you vote?

I hope it is not a hung parliament because Australia needs a stable and functional Parliament at this time in our history, not one that becomes fractured.

I will be supporting a Liberal government.

This is a key issue at this election in North Sydney.  Voters are choosing the next government of Australia and it is wrong for candidates not to disclose who they would support – voters have the right to know this before they go to the ballot box.  It’s basic integrity and transparency as there is no 30-day refund with your vote and who you elect. The policies of both major parties are known and there is no reason any other candidate cannot be upfront and honest about who they would vote for in a hung parliament.

6. Give us a brief overview of your position on the following:
– Whether there should be a Federal ICAC

I am strongly in favour of a federal integrity commission. We must get the structure right and we have models around Australia to learn from. We must ensure that the bedrock of our legal system – the presumption of innocence is preserved in the federal model and the way it practically operates. I don’t want to see an integrity commission where careers are destroyed before any findings of wrongdoing are made and this goes to the issue of when and how public hearings are conducted.

 – How Australia should handle the recent news of China’s involvement in the Solomon Islands

Australia will always work constructively and respectfully with our Pacific family, and we have expanded aid to the region as part of focus on the region. Australia has been consistent and clear in stating our respect for the Solomon Islands’ sovereign decision-making, however we have reiterated our deep concerns about the security agreement with China, including the lack of transparency. I am buoyed by the fact the Foreign Minister recently met with her Solomon Islands counterpart and reaffirmed that Australia remains their most trusted security partner.

 – What action needs to be taken on climate change

As our community knows, I have and always will be an advocate for strong climate policy. I am proud to have been pivotal to securing our net zero by 2050 commitment, which now has bipartisan support. We are projecting that our emissions will fall by 35 per cent by 2030.

Federal and state policies are facilitating rapid change. Renewables have become the cheapest form of new power and our $20 billion technology roadmap will see the fast growth in renewables and new technology continue. We are also investing in areas like hydrogen, battery storage and major projects like Snowy Hydro and Tasmania’s Battery of the Nation program. We have recently passed legislation to allow offshore windfarms and we are supporting the rollout of charging stations for EVs across the nation, including here in our community.

We are also working to promote clean energy technology globally. The key to ensuring we see meaningful change in the biggest emitting nations like China and India is to ensure that low emissions technology becomes the option of choice because it is proven and the most economic and our work will help drive that outcome.

I will always be an advocate for more ambition and sensible policies to advance our emissions reductions and the opportunities this can bring for our economy.

 – How small businesses struggling in the wake of Covid can be assisted

Our local retail and business precincts are a generator of both local employment but also important centres for our community.

The Liberal government has particularly focused on improving support for small business.  For example, we have cut the company tax rates for small and medium size businesses from 30 to 25 per cent and in this year’s federal budget we extended and expanded the instant asset write off for small businesses to apply for the purchase of equipment up to $30,000 and for businesses with turnover less than $50 million.  We have also introduced two key measures which will provide a tax incentive for the deployment of technology and training in small businesses.

 – What can be done to ease the soaring costs of living in Australia

A major focus of the recent Budget was to ease cost of living pressures for Australians. This included cutting fuel excise in half for the next six months – saving Australians 22 cents a litre every time they fill up their vehicle. We are providing a one-off $420 cost of living tax offset for more than 10 million low-and-middle income earners. Individuals receiving the low and middle income tax offset will now receive up to $1,500 and couples up to $3,000 from 1 July this year and we have delivered a one-off $250 cost of living payment for more than 6 million Australia receiving the aged pension and other payments.

We are also committed to stage 3 of our personal income tax reforms which will reduce the tax burden for many local residents. Our legislated plan will see 95 per cent of taxpayers pay no more than 30 cents in the dollar.

7. How will you stay in touch with the people in your electorate to make sure their views are represented in Canberra?

My favourite part of being an MP is working with our community. Whether it be meeting constituents, being at community events or attending citizenship ceremonies. It is these one-on-one interactions I have with constituents that helps to shape and form my views that I take to Canberra and if re-elected, I’ll continue to do this. I also regularly provide opportunities for constituents to convey their views at public meetings, mobile offices in shopping centres and, during COVID where face to face activity was constrained, with surveys so feedback is simple.

8. How can we learn more about your views and stay in touch with your campaign for the Federal Election North Sydney?

Check out my Facebook or Instagram pages or get in touch with my friendly team anytime to let me know how I can better assist you and your family!

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